The Organic Food Shopper’s Guide [Paperback]

Cox, a former editor at Organic Gardening magazine, has been promoting organics since long before it was fashionable. Using his 30 years of organics knowledge in this guide-cum-cookbook, he attempts to untangle, for the average consumer, the confusing mess of what to eat. Readers will find concrete advice in this basic primer: the science of organic farming is followed by a product-by-product guide to organically farmed foods that can be found in the market. Organized by food group (vegetables, fruits, protein, etc.), each food is broken down by season—how to shop for it, the reason to buy the organic version, and a simple recipe or two that showcases the strength of the main ingredient. The best answer for the health of humans and the health of the planet is to buy everything organic, and the eventual redundancy of the “organic advantage” paragraph on each food reveals just that; there are only so many ways to explain that the product tastes better and that the farming method doesn’t destroy the soil. The best parts of the book are the informational inset boxes; Cox is knowledgeable about all the food issues facing consumers and these boxes—including information on mad cow, local agriculture, fair trade and food labeling—showcase his expertise. (Feb.) (Publishers Weekly, December 17, 2007)

Renee’s Edamame Soy Beans Seeds

Edamame soybeans’ flavor is nutty, buttery and truly irresistible fresh from the garden and they pack top nutritional value. Cook them quickly, right in their pods for appetizers and snacks or use like fresh beans in any recipe. We import our seed from Japan, where edamame are a long-standing favorite. These widely adapted 2 foot tall bush plants offer consistently high yields of large 3 to 3-1/2 inch green pods with 3 to 4 plump and tasty beans per pod.

Once you pick these tasty beans all you have to do is toss them in a pot, still in their pods, of salty water. Boil for 5 or 6 minutes and you have a guilt free snack.

  • This grows two feet tall with high yields.
  • Packed with nutrition and easy to prepare
  • Wait until your weather warms up before planting
  • Just boil it in salted water and you have a great snack.

Grow Great Grub: Organic Food from Small Spaces

Your patio, balcony, rooftop, front stoop, boulevard, windowsill, planter box, or fire escape is a potential fresh food garden waiting to happen. In Grow Great Grub, Gayla Trail, the founder of the leading online gardening community (YouGrowGirl.com), shows you how to grow your own delicious, affordable, organic edibles virtually anywhere.

Grow Great Grub packs in tips and essential information about:

  • Choosing a location and making the most of your soil (even if it’s less than perfect)
  • Building a raised bed, compost bin, and self-watering container using recycled materials
  • Keeping pests and diseases away from your plants—the toxin-free way
  • Growing bountiful crops in pots and selecting the best heirloom varieties
  • Cultivating hundreds of plants, from blueberries to Thai basil, to the best tomatoes you’ll ever taste
  • Canning, and preserving to make the most of your garden’s generosity
  • Green-friendly, cost-saving, growing, and building projects that are smart and stylish
  • And much more!

Whether you’re looking to eat on a budget or simply experience the pleasure of picking tonight’s meal from right outside your door, this is the must-have book for small-space gardeners—no backyard required.

GAYLA TRAIL is the creator of the acclaimed top gardening website yougrowgirl.com. Her work as a writer and photographer has appeared in publications including The New York Times, Newsweek, Budget Living, and ReadyMade. A resident of Toronto who has grown a garden on her rooftop for more than 10 years, she is the author of You Grow Girl: The Groundbreaking Guide to Gardening.